This version of GitHub Enterprise will be discontinued on 2021-09-23. No patch releases will be made, even for critical security issues. For better performance, improved security, and new features, upgrade to the latest version of GitHub Enterprise. For help with the upgrade, contact GitHub Enterprise support.

About repositories

A repository contains all of your project's files and each file's revision history. You can discuss and manage your project's work within the repository.

About repositories

You can own repositories individually, or you can share ownership of repositories with other people in an organization.

You can restrict who has access to a repository by choosing the repository's visibility. For more information, see "About repository visibility."

For user-owned repositories, you can give other people collaborator access so that they can collaborate on your project. If a repository is owned by an organization, you can give organization members access permissions to collaborate on your repository. For more information, see "Permission levels for a user account repository" and "Repository permission levels for an organization."

Each person and organization can own unlimited repositories and invite an unlimited number of collaborators to all repositories.

You can use repositories to manage your work and collaborate with others.

  • You can use issues to collect user feedback, report software bugs, and organize tasks you'd like to accomplish. For more information, see "About issues."
  • You can use pull requests to propose changes to a repository. For more information, see "About pull requests."
  • You can use project boards to organize and prioritize your issues and pull requests. For more information, see "About project boards."

About repository visibility

You can restrict who has access to a repository by choosing a repository's visibility: public, internal, or private.

When you create a repository, you can choose to make the repository public or private. If you're creating the repository in an organization, you can also choose to make the repository internal.

If your GitHub Enterprise Server instance is not in private mode or behind a firewall, public repositories are accessible to everyone on the internet. Otherwise, public repositories are available to everyone using your GitHub Enterprise Server instance, including outside collaborators. Private repositories are only accessible to you, people you explicitly share access with, and, for organization repositories, certain organization members. Internal repositories are accessible to enterprise members. For more information, see "About internal repositories."

Organization owners always have access to every repository created in an organization. For more information, see "Repository permission levels for an organization."

People with admin permissions for a repository can change an existing repository's visibility. For more information, see "Setting repository visibility."

About internal repositories

Note: Internal repositories are available with GitHub Enterprise Cloud and GitHub Enterprise Server 2.20+. For more information, see "GitHub's products."

You can use internal repositories to practice "innersource" within your enterprise. Members of your enterprise can collaborate using open source methodologies without sharing proprietary information publicly, even with private mode disabled. For more information on innersource, see GitHub's whitepaper "An introduction to innersource."

All enterprise members have read permissions to the internal repository, but internal repositories are not visible to people who are not members of an organization, including outside collaborators on organization repositories. For more information, see "Repository permission levels for an organization."

If a user is removed from all organizations owned by the enterprise, that user's forks of internal repositories are removed automatically.

Limits for viewing content and diffs in a repository

Certain types of resources can be quite large, requiring excessive processing on GitHub Enterprise Server. Because of this, limits are set to ensure requests complete in a reasonable amount of time.

Most of the limits below affect both GitHub Enterprise Server and the API.

Text limits

Text files over 512 KB are always displayed as plain text. Code is not syntax highlighted, and prose files are not converted to HTML (such as Markdown, AsciiDoc, etc.).

Text files over 5 MB are only available through their raw URLs, which are served through [hostname]/user/repo/raw; for example, https://[hostname]/user/repo/raw/octocat/Spoon-Knife/master/index.html. Click the Raw button to get the raw URL for a file.

Diff limits

Because diffs can become very large, we impose these limits on diffs for commits, pull requests, and compare views:

  • In a pull request, no total diff may exceed 20,000 lines that you can load or 1 MB of raw diff data.
  • No single file's diff may exceed 20,000 lines that you can load or 500 KB of raw diff data. Four hundred lines and 20 KB are automatically loaded for a single file.
  • The maximum number of files in a single diff is limited to 300.
  • The maximum number of renderable files (such as images, PDFs, and GeoJSON files) in a single diff is limited to 25.

Some portions of a limited diff may be displayed, but anything exceeding the limit is not shown.

Commit listings limits

The compare view and pull requests pages display a list of commits between the base and head revisions. These lists are limited to 250 commits. If they exceed that limit, a note indicates that additional commits are present (but they're not shown).

Further reading

Did this doc help you?Privacy policy

Help us make these docs great!

All GitHub docs are open source. See something that's wrong or unclear? Submit a pull request.

Make a contribution

Or, learn how to contribute.