Article version: Enterprise Server 2.19

Creating a new repository

You can create a new repository on your personal account or any organization where you have sufficient permissions.

Tip: Owners can restrict repository creation permissions in an organization. For more information, see "Restricting repository creation in your organization."

  1. In the upper-right corner of any page, use the drop-down menu, and select New repository.

    Drop-down with option to create a new repository

  2. Optionally, to create a repository with the directory structure and files of an existing repository, use the Choose a template drop-down and select a template repository. You'll see template repositories that are owned by you and organizations you're a member of or that you've used before. For more information, see "Creating a repository from a template."

    Template drop-down menu

  3. In the Owner drop-down, select the account you wish to create the repository on.

    Owner drop-down menu

  4. Type a name for your repository, and an optional description.

    Create repository field

  5. Choose a repository visibility. For more information, see "About repository visibility."

    Radio buttons to select repository visibility

  6. If you're not using a template, there are a number of optional items you can pre-populate your repository with. If you're importing an existing repository to GitHub Enterprise, don't choose any of these options, as you may introduce a merge conflict. You can add or create new files using the user interface or choose to add new files using the command line later. For more information, see "Importing a Git repository using the command line," "Adding a file to a repository using the command line," and "Addressing merge conflicts."

    • You can create a README, which is a document describing your project. For more information, see "About READMEs."
    • You can create a .gitignore file, which is a set of ignore rules. For more information, see "Ignoring files."
  7. Click Create repository.

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