Skip to main content

Esta versión de GitHub Enterprise Server se discontinuará el 2024-03-07. No se realizarán lanzamientos de patch, ni siquiera para problemas de seguridad críticos. Para obtener rendimiento mejorado, seguridad mejorada y nuevas características, actualice a la versión más reciente de GitHub Enterprise Server. Para obtener ayuda con la actualización, póngase en contacto con el soporte técnico de GitHub Enterprise.

Introducción a la API REST

Obtén información sobre el uso de la API de REST de GitHub.

Introduction

This article describes how to use the GitHub REST API with GitHub CLI, curl, or JavaScript. For a quickstart guide, see "Quickstart for GitHub REST API."

About requests to the REST API

This section describes the elements that make up an API request:

Every request to the REST API includes an HTTP method and a path. Depending on the REST API endpoint, you might also need to specify request headers, authentication information, query parameters, or body parameters.

The REST API reference documentation describes the HTTP method, path, and parameters for every endpoint. It also displays example requests and responses for each endpoint. For more information, see the REST reference documentation.

HTTP method

The HTTP method of an endpoint defines the type of action it performs on a given resource. Some common HTTP methods are GET, POST, DELETE, and PATCH. The REST API reference documentation provides the HTTP method for every endpoint.

For example, the HTTP method for the "List repository issues" endpoint is GET."

Where possible, the GitHub Enterprise Server REST API strives to use an appropriate HTTP method for each action.

  • GET: Used for retrieving resources.
  • POST: Used for creating resources.
  • PATCH: Used for updating properties of resources.
  • PUT: Used for replacing resources or collections of resources.
  • DELETE: Used for deleting resources.

Path

Each endpoint has a path. The REST API reference documentation gives the path for every endpoint. For example, the path for the "List repository issues" endpoint is /repos/{owner}/{repo}/issues.

The curly brackets {} in a path denote path parameters that you need to specify. Path parameters modify the endpoint path and are required in your request. For example, the path parameters for the "List repository issues" endpoint are {owner} and {repo}. To use this path in your API request, replace {repo} with the name of the repository where you would like to request a list of issues, and replace {owner} with the name of the account that owns the repository.

Headers

Headers provide extra information about the request and the desired response. Following are some examples of headers that you can use in your requests to the GitHub REST API. For an example of a request that uses headers, see "Making a request."

Accept

Most GitHub REST API endpoints specify that you should pass an Accept header with a value of application/vnd.github+json. The value of the Accept header is a media type. For more information about media types, see "Media types."

Media types

You can specify one or more media types by adding them to the Accept header of your request. For more information about the Accept header, see "Accept."

Media types specify the format of the data you want to consume from the API. Media types are specific to resources, allowing them to change independently and support formats that other resources don't. The documentation for each GitHub REST API endpoint will describe the media types that it supports. For more information, see the "GitHub REST API documentation."

The most common media types supported by the GitHub REST API are application/vnd.github+json and application/json.

There are custom media types that you can use with some endpoints. For example, the REST API to manage commits and pull requests support the media types diff, patch, and sha. The media types full, raw, text, or html are used by some other endpoints.

All custom media types for GitHub Enterprise Server look like this: application/vnd.github.PARAM+json, where PARAM is the name of the media type. For example, to specify the raw media type, you would use application/vnd.github.raw+json.

For an example of a request that uses media types, see "Making a request."

Authentication

Many endpoints require authentication or return additional information if you are authenticated. Additionally, you can make more requests per hour when you are authenticated.

To authenticate your request, you will need to provide an authentication token with the required scopes or permissions. There a few different ways to get a token: You can create a personal access token, generate a token with a GitHub App, or use the built-in GITHUB_TOKEN in a GitHub Actions workflow. For more information, see "Authenticating to the REST API."

For an example of a request that uses an authentication token, see "Making a request."

Note: If you don't want to create a token, you can use GitHub CLI. GitHub CLI will take care of authentication for you, and help keep your account secure. For more information, see the GitHub CLI version of this page.

Warning: Treat your access token the same way you would treat your passwords or other sensitive credentials. For more information, see "Keeping your API credentials secure."

Although some REST API endpoints are accessible without authentication, GitHub CLI requires you to authenticate before you can use the api subcommand to make an API request. Use the auth login subcommand to authenticate to GitHub Enterprise Server. For more information, see "Making a request."

To authenticate your request, you will need to provide an authentication token with the required scopes or permissions. There a few different ways to get a token: You can create a personal access token, generate a token with a GitHub App, or use the built-in GITHUB_TOKEN in a GitHub Actions workflow. For more information, see "Authenticating to the REST API."

For an example of a request that uses an authentication token, see "Making a request."

Warning: Treat your access token the same way you would treat your passwords or other sensitive credentials. For more information, see "Keeping your API credentials secure."

Parameters

Many API methods require or allow you to send additional information in parameters in your request. There are a few different types of parameters: Path parameters, body parameters, and query parameters.

Path parameters

Path parameters modify the endpoint path. These parameters are required in your request. For more information, see "Path."

Body parameters

Body parameters allow you to pass additional data to the API. These parameters can be optional or required, depending on the endpoint. For example, a body parameter may allow you to specify an issue title when creating a new issue, or specify certain settings when enabling or disabling a feature. The documentation for each GitHub REST API endpoint will describe the body parameters that it supports. For more information, see the "GitHub REST API documentation."

For example, the "Create an issue" endpoint requires that you specify a title for the new issue in your request. It also allows you to optionally specify other information, such as text to put in the issue body, users to assign to the new issue, or labels to apply to the new issue. For an example of a request that uses body parameters, see "Making a request."

You must authenticate your request to pass body parameters. For more information, see "Authenticating."

Query parameters

Query parameters allow you to control what data is returned for a request. These parameters are usually optional. The documentation for each GitHub REST API endpoint will describe any query parameters that it supports. For more information, see the "GitHub REST API documentation."

For example, the "List public events" endpoint returns thirty issues by default. You can use the per_page query parameter to return two issues instead of 30. You can use the page query parameter to fetch only the first page of results. For an example of a request that uses query parameters, see "Making a request."

Making a request

This section demonstrates how to make an authenticated request to the GitHub REST API using GitHub CLI.

1. Setup

Install GitHub CLI on macOS, Windows, or Linux. For more information, see Installation in the GitHub CLI repository.

2. Authenticate

  1. Authenticate with GitHub by running this command from your terminal. Replace HOSTNAME with the name of your GitHub Enterprise Server instance. For example, octo-inc.ghe.com.

    Shell
    gh auth login --hostname HOSTNAME
    

    You can use the --scopes option to specify what scopes you want. If you want to authenticate with a token that you created, you can use the --with-token option. For more information, see the GitHub CLI auth login documentation.

  2. Follow the on-screen prompts.

    GitHub CLI automatically stores your Git credentials for you when you choose HTTPS as your preferred protocol for Git operations and answer "yes" to the prompt asking if you would like to authenticate to Git with your GitHub credentials. This can be useful as it allows you to use Git commands like git push and git pull without needing to set up a separate credential manager or use SSH.

3. Choose an endpoint for your request

  1. Choose an endpoint to make a request to. You can explore GitHub Enterprise Server's REST API documentation to discover endpoints that you can use to interact with GitHub Enterprise Server.

  2. Identify the HTTP method and path of the endpoint. You will send these with your request. For more information, see "HTTP method" and "Path."

    For example, the "Create an issue" endpoint uses the HTTP method POST and the path /repos/{owner}/{repo}/issues.

  3. Identify any required path parameters. Required path parameters appear in curly brackets {} in the path of the endpoint. Replace each parameter placeholder with the desired value. For more information, see "Path."

    For example, the "Create an issue" endpoint uses the path /repos/{owner}/{repo}/issues, and the path parameters are {owner} and {repo}. To use this path in your API request, replace {repo} with the name of the repository where you would like to create a new issue, and replace {owner} with the name of the account that owns the repository.

4. Make a request with GitHub CLI

Use the GitHub CLI api subcommand to make your API request. For more information, see the GitHub CLI api documentation.

In your request, specify the following options and values:

  • --method followed by the HTTP method and the path of the endpoint. For more information, see "HTTP method" and "Path."

  • --header:

    • Accept: Pass the media type in an Accept header. To pass multiple media types in an Accept header, separate the media types with a comma: Accept: application/vnd.github+json,application/vnd.github.diff. For more information, see "Accept" and "Media types."
  • -f or -F followed by any body parameters or query parameters in key=value format. Use the -F option to pass a parameter that is a number, Boolean, or null. Use the -f option to pass string parameters.

    Some endpoints use query parameters that are arrays. To send an array in the query string, use the query parameter once per array item, and append [] after the query parameter name. For example, to provide an array of two repository IDs, use -f repository_ids[]=REPOSITORY_A_ID -f repository_ids[]=REPOSITORY_B_ID.

    If you do not need to specify any body parameters or query parameters in your request, omit this option. For more information, see "Body parameters" and "Query parameters." For examples, see "Example request using body parameters" and "Example request using query parameters."

Example request

The following example request uses the "Get Octocat" endpoint to return the octocat as ASCII art.

Shell
gh api --method GET /octocat \
--header 'Accept: application/vnd.github+json' \
--header "X-GitHub-Api-Version: 2022-11-28"

Example request using query parameters

The "List public events" endpoint returns thirty issues by default. The following example uses the per_page query parameter to return two issues instead of 30, and the page query parameter to fetch only the first page of results.

Shell
gh api --method GET /events -F per_page=2 -F page=1
--header 'Accept: application/vnd.github+json' \

Example request using body parameters

The following example uses the "Create an issue" endpoint to create a new issue in a specified repository. Replace REPO-NAME with the name of the repository where you want to create a new issue, and replace REPO-OWNER with the name of the account that owns the repository. In the response, find the html_url of your issue, and navigate to your issue in the browser.

Shell
gh api --method POST /repos/REPO-OWNER/REPO-NAME/issues \
--header "Accept: application/vnd.github+json" \
--header "X-GitHub-Api-Version: 2022-11-28" \
-f title='Created with the REST API' \
-f body='This is a test issue created by the REST API' \

This section demonstrates how to make an authenticated request to the GitHub REST API using curl.

1. Setup

You must have curl installed on your machine. To check if curl is already installed, run curl --version on the command line.

  • If the output provides information about the version of curl, that means curl is installed.
  • If you get a message similar to command not found: curl, that means curl is not installed. Download and install curl. For more information, see the curl download page.

2. Choose an endpoint for your request

  1. Choose an endpoint to make a request to. You can explore GitHub Enterprise Server's REST API documentation to discover endpoints that you can use to interact with GitHub Enterprise Server.

  2. Identify the HTTP method and path of the endpoint. You will send these with your request. For more information, see "HTTP method" and "Path."

    For example, the "Create an issue" endpoint uses the HTTP method POST and the path /repos/{owner}/{repo}/issues.

  3. Identify any required path parameters. Required path parameters appear in curly brackets {} in the path of the endpoint. Replace each parameter placeholder with the desired value. For more information, see "Path."

    For example, the "Create an issue" endpoint uses the path /repos/{owner}/{repo}/issues, and the path parameters are {owner} and {repo}. To use this path in your API request, replace {repo} with the name of the repository where you would like to create a new issue, and replace {owner} with the name of the account that owns the repository.

3. Create authentication credentials

Create an access token to authenticate your request. You can save your token and use it for multiple requests. Give the token any scopes or permissions that are required to access the endpoint. You will send this token in an Authorization header with your request. For more information, see "Authentication."

4. Make a curl request

Use the curl command to make your request. For more information, see the curl documentation.

Specify the following options and values in your request:

  • --request or -X followed by the HTTP method as the value. For more information, see "HTTP method."

  • --url followed by the full path as the value. The full path is a URL that includes the base URL for the GitHub REST API (https://api.github.com) and the path of the endpoint, like this: http(s)://HOSTNAME/api/v3/PATH. Replace HOSTNAME with the name of your GitHub Enterprise Server instance. Replace PATH with the path of the endpoint. For more information, see "Path."

    To use query parameters, add a ? to the end of the path, then append your query parameter name and value in the form parameter_name=value. Separate multiple query parameters with &. If you need to send an array in the query string, use the query parameter once per array item, and append [] after the query parameter name. For example, to provide an array of two repository IDs, use ?repository_ids[]=REPOSITORY_A_ID&repository_ids[]=REPOSITORY_B_ID. For more information, see "Query parameters." For an example, see "Example request using query parameters."

  • --header or -H:

    • Accept: Pass the media type in an Accept header. To pass multiple media types in an Accept header, separate the media types with a comma, for example: Accept: application/vnd.github+json,application/vnd.github.diff. For more information, see "Accept" and "Media types."
    • Authorization: Pass your authentication token in an Authorization header. Note that in most cases you can use Authorization: Bearer or Authorization: token to pass a token. However, if you are passing a JSON web token (JWT), you must use Authorization: Bearer. For more information, see "Authentication." For an example of a request that uses an Authorization header, see "Example request using body parameters."
  • --data or -d followed by any body parameters within a JSON object. If you do not need to specify any body parameters in your request, omit this option. For more information, see "Body parameters." For an example, see "Example request using body parameters."

Example request

The following example request uses the "Get Octocat" endpoint to return the octocat as ASCII art.

Shell
curl --request GET \
--url "https://api.github.com/octocat" \
--header "Accept: application/vnd.github+json" \
--header "X-GitHub-Api-Version: 2022-11-28"

Example request using query parameters

The "List public events" endpoint returns thirty issues by default. The following example uses the per_page query parameter to return two issues instead of 30, and the page query parameter to fetch only the first page of results.

Shell
curl --request GET \
--url "http(s)://HOSTNAME/api/v3/events?per_page=2&page=1" \
--header "Accept: application/vnd.github+json" \
--header "X-GitHub-Api-Version: 2022-11-28" \
  https://api.github.com/events

Example request using body parameters

The following example uses the "Create an issue" endpoint to create a new issue in a specified repository. Replace HOSTNAME with the name of your GitHub Enterprise Server instance. Replace REPO-NAME with the name of the repository where you want to create a new issue, and replace REPO-OWNER with the name of the account that owns the repository. Replace YOUR-TOKEN with the authentication token you created in a previous step.

Shell
curl \
--request POST \
--url "http(s)://HOSTNAME/api/v3/repos/REPO-OWNER/REPO-NAME/issues" \
--header "Accept: application/vnd.github+json" \
--header "Authorization: Bearer YOUR-TOKEN" \
--data '{
  "title": "Created with the REST API",
  "body": "This is a test issue created by the REST API"
}'

This section demonstrates how to make a request to the GitHub REST API using JavaScript and Octokit.js. For a more detailed guide, see "Scripting with the REST API and JavaScript."

1. Setup

You must install octokit to use the Octokit.js library shown in the following examples.

  • Install octokit. For example, npm install octokit. For other ways to install or load octokit, see the Octokit.js README.

2. Choose an endpoint for your request

  1. Choose an endpoint to make a request to. You can explore GitHub Enterprise Server's REST API documentation to discover endpoints that you can use to interact with GitHub Enterprise Server.

  2. Identify the HTTP method and path of the endpoint. You will send these with your request. For more information, see "HTTP method" and "Path."

    For example, the "Create an issue" endpoint uses the HTTP method POST and the path /repos/{owner}/{repo}/issues.

  3. Identify any required path parameters. Required path parameters appear in curly brackets {} in the path of the endpoint. Replace each parameter placeholder with the desired value. For more information, see "Path."

    For example, the "Create an issue" endpoint uses the path /repos/{owner}/{repo}/issues, and the path parameters are {owner} and {repo}. To use this path in your API request, replace {repo} with the name of the repository where you would like to create a new issue, and replace {owner} with the name of the account that owns the repository.

3. Create an access token

Create an access token to authenticate your request. You can save your token and use it for multiple requests. Give the token any scopes or permissions that are required to access the endpoint. You will send this token in an Authorization header with your request. For more information, see "Authentication."

4. Make a request with Octokit.js

  1. Import octokit in your script. For example, import { Octokit } from "octokit";. For other ways to import octokit, see the Octokit.js README.

  2. Create an instance of Octokit with your token. Set the base URL to http(s)://HOSTNAME/api/v3. Replace HOSTNAME with the name of your GitHub Enterprise Server instance. Replace YOUR-TOKEN with your token.

    JavaScript
    const octokit = new Octokit({ 
      baseUrl: "http(s)://HOSTNAME/api/v3",
      auth: 'YOUR-TOKEN'
    });
    
  3. Use octokit.request to execute your request.

    • Send the HTTP method and path as the first argument to the request method. For more information, see "HTTP method" and "Path."
    • Specify all path, query, and body parameters in an object as the second argument to the request method. For more information, see "Parameters."

    In the following example request, the HTTP method is POST, the path is /repos/{owner}/{repo}/issues, the path parameters are owner: "REPO-OWNER" and repo: "REPO-NAME", and the body parameters are title: "Created with the REST API" and body: "This is a test issue created by the REST API". Replace REPO-OWNER with the name of the account that owns the repository, and REPO-NAME with the name of the repository.

    JavaScript
    await octokit.request("POST /repos/{owner}/{repo}/issues", {
      owner: "REPO-OWNER",
      repo: "REPO-NAME",
      title: "Created with the REST API",
      body: "This is a test issue created by the REST API",
    });
    

    The request method automatically passes the Accept: application/vnd.github+json header. To pass additional headers or a different Accept header, add a headers property to the object that is passed as a second argument. The value of the headers property is an object with the header names as keys and header values as values.

    For example, the following code will send a content-type header with a value of text/plain.

    JavaScript
    await octokit.request("GET /octocat", {
      headers: {
        "content-type": "text/plain",
      },
    });
    

Using the response

After you make a request, the API will return the response status code, response headers, and potentially a response body.

About the response code and headers

Every request will return an HTTP status code that indicates the success of the response. For more information about response codes, see the MDN HTTP response status code documentation.

Additionally, the response will include headers that give more details about the response. Headers that start with X- or x- are custom to GitHub. For example, the x-ratelimit-remaining and x-ratelimit-reset headers tell you how many requests you can make in a time period.

To view the status code and headers, use the --include or --i option when you send your request.

For example, this request gets a list of issues in a specified repository:

gh api \
--header 'Accept: application/vnd.github+json' \
--method GET /repos/REPO-OWNER/REPO-NAME/issues \
-F per_page=2 --include

And it returns a response code and headers that look something like this:

HTTP/2.0 200 OK
Access-Control-Allow-Origin: *
Access-Control-Expose-Headers: ETag, Link, Location, Retry-After, X-GitHub-OTP, X-RateLimit-Limit, X-RateLimit-Remaining, X-RateLimit-Used, X-RateLimit-Resource, X-RateLimit-Reset, X-OAuth-Scopes, X-Accepted-OAuth-Scopes, X-Poll-Interval, X-GitHub-Media-Type, X-GitHub-SSO, X-GitHub-Request-Id, Deprecation, Sunset
Cache-Control: private, max-age=60, s-maxage=60
Content-Security-Policy: default-src 'none'
Content-Type: application/json; charset=utf-8
Date: Thu, 04 Aug 2022 19:56:41 GMT
Etag: W/"a63dfbcfdb73621e9d2e89551edcf9856731ced534bd7f1e114a5da1f5f73418"
Link: <https://api.github.com/repositories/1300192/issues?per_page=1&page=2>; rel="next", <https://api.github.com/repositories/1300192/issues?per_page=1&page=14817>; rel="last"
Referrer-Policy: origin-when-cross-origin, strict-origin-when-cross-origin
Server: GitHub.com
Strict-Transport-Security: max-age=31536000; includeSubdomains; preload
Vary: Accept, Authorization, Cookie, X-GitHub-OTP, Accept-Encoding, Accept, X-Requested-With
X-Accepted-Oauth-Scopes: repo
X-Content-Type-Options: nosniff
X-Frame-Options: deny
X-Github-Api-Version-Selected: 2022-08-09
X-Github-Media-Type: github.v3; format=json
X-Github-Request-Id: 1C73:26D4:E2E500:1EF78F4:62EC2479
X-Oauth-Client-Id: 178c6fc778ccc68e1d6a
X-Oauth-Scopes: gist, read:org, repo, workflow
X-Ratelimit-Limit: 15000
X-Ratelimit-Remaining: 14996
X-Ratelimit-Reset: 1659645499
X-Ratelimit-Resource: core
X-Ratelimit-Used: 4
X-Xss-Protection: 0

In this example, the response code is 200, which indicates a successful request.

When you make a request with Octokit.js, the request method returns a promise. If the request was successful, the promise resolves to an object that includes the HTTP status code of the response (status) and the response headers (headers). If an error occurs, the promise resolves to an object that includes the HTTP status code of the response (status) and the response headers (response.headers).

You can use a try/catch block to catch an error if it occurs. For example, if the request in the following script is successful, the script will log the status code and the value of the x-ratelimit-remaining header. If the request was not successful, the script will log the status code, the value of the x-ratelimit-remaining header, and the error message.

In the following example, replace REPO-OWNER with the name of the account that owns the repository, and REPO-NAME with the name of the repository.

JavaScript
try {
  const result = await octokit.request("GET /repos/{owner}/{repo}/issues", {
    owner: "REPO-OWNER",
    repo: "REPO-NAME",
    per_page: 2,
  });

  console.log(`Success! Status: ${result.status}. Rate limit remaining: ${result.headers["x-ratelimit-remaining"]}`)

} catch (error) {
  console.log(`Error! Status: ${error.status}. Rate limit remaining: ${error.headers["x-ratelimit-remaining"]}. Message: ${error.response.data.message}`)
}

To view the status code and headers, use the --include or --i option when you send your request.

For example, this request gets a list of issues in a specified repository:

curl --request GET \
--url "https://api.github.com/repos/REPO-OWNER/REPO-NAME/issues?per_page=2" \
--header "Accept: application/vnd.github+json" \
--header "Authorization: Bearer YOUR-TOKEN" \
--include

And it returns a response code and headers that look something like this:

HTTP/2 200
server: GitHub.com
date: Thu, 04 Aug 2022 20:07:51 GMT
content-type: application/json; charset=utf-8
cache-control: public, max-age=60, s-maxage=60
vary: Accept, Accept-Encoding, Accept, X-Requested-With
etag: W/"7fceb7e8c958d3ec4d02524b042578dcc7b282192e6c939070f4a70390962e18"
x-github-media-type: github.v3; format=json
link: <https://api.github.com/repositories/1300192/issues?per_page=2&sort=updated&direction=asc&page=2>; rel="next", <https://api.github.com/repositories/1300192/issues?per_page=2&sort=updated&direction=asc&page=7409>; rel="last"
access-control-expose-headers: ETag, Link, Location, Retry-After, X-GitHub-OTP, X-RateLimit-Limit, X-RateLimit-Remaining, X-RateLimit-Used, X-RateLimit-Resource, X-RateLimit-Reset, X-OAuth-Scopes, X-Accepted-OAuth-Scopes, X-Poll-Interval, X-GitHub-Media-Type, X-GitHub-SSO, X-GitHub-Request-Id, Deprecation, Sunset
access-control-allow-origin: *
strict-transport-security: max-age=31536000; includeSubdomains; preload
x-frame-options: deny
x-content-type-options: nosniff
x-xss-protection: 0
referrer-policy: origin-when-cross-origin, strict-origin-when-cross-origin
content-security-policy: default-src 'none'
x-ratelimit-limit: 15000
x-ratelimit-remaining: 14996
x-ratelimit-reset: 1659645535
x-ratelimit-resource: core
x-ratelimit-used: 4
accept-ranges: bytes
content-length: 4936
x-github-request-id: 14E0:4BC6:F1B8BA:208E317:62EC2715

In this example, the response code is 200, which indicates a successful request.

About the response body

Many endpoints will return a response body. Unless otherwise specified, the response body is in JSON format. Blank fields are included as null instead of being omitted. All timestamps return in UTC time, ISO 8601 format: YYYY-MM-DDTHH:MM:SSZ.

Unlike the GraphQL API where you specify what information you want, the REST API typically returns more information than you need. If desired, you can parse the response to pull out specific pieces of information.

For example, you can use > to redirect the response to a file. In the following example, replace REPO-OWNER with the name of the account that owns the repository, and REPO-NAME with the name of the repository.

Shell
gh api \
--header 'Accept: application/vnd.github+json' \
--method GET /repos/REPO-OWNER/REPO-NAME/issues \
-F per_page=2 > data.json

Then you can use jq to get the title and author ID of each issue:

Shell
jq '.[] | {title: .title, authorID: .user.id}' data.json

The previous two commands return something like:

{
  "title": "Update index.html",
  "authorID": 10701255
}
{
  "title": "Edit index file",
  "authorID": 53709285
}

For more information about jq, see the jq documentation.

For example, you can get the title and author ID of each issue. In the following example, replace REPO-OWNER with the name of the account that owns the repository, and REPO-NAME with the name of the repository.

JavaScript
try {
  const result = await octokit.request("GET /repos/{owner}/{repo}/issues", {
    owner: "REPO-OWNER",
    repo: "REPO-NAME",
    per_page: 2,
  });

  const titleAndAuthor = result.data.map(issue => {title: issue.title, authorID: issue.user.id})

  console.log(titleAndAuthor)

} catch (error) {
  console.log(`Error! Status: ${error.status}. Message: ${error.response.data.message}`)
}

For example, you can use > to redirect the response to a file. In the following example, replace REPO-OWNER with the name of the account that owns the repository, and REPO-NAME with the name of the repository. Replace HOSTNAME with the name of your GitHub Enterprise Server instance.

Shell
curl --request GET \
--url "http(s)://HOSTNAME/api/v3/repos/REPO-OWNER/REPO-NAME/issues?per_page=2" \
--header "Accept: application/vnd.github+json" \
--header "Authorization: Bearer YOUR-TOKEN" > data.json

Then you can use jq to get the title and author ID of each issue:

Shell
jq '.[] | {title: .title, authorID: .user.id}' data.json

The previous two commands return something like:

{
  "title": "Update index.html",
  "authorID": 10701255
}
{
  "title": "Edit index file",
  "authorID": 53709285
}

For more information about jq, see the jq documentation.

Detailed versus summary representations

A response can include all attributes for a resource or only a subset of attributes, depending on whether you fetch an individual resource or a list of resources.

  • When you fetch an individual resource, like a specific repository, the response will typically include all attributes for that resource. This is the "detailed" representation of the resource.
  • When you fetch a list of resources, like a list of multiple repositories, the response will only include a subset of the attributes for each resource. This is the "summary" representation of the resource.

Note that authorization sometimes influences the amount of detail included in a representation.

The reason for this is because some attributes are computationally expensive for the API to provide, so GitHub excludes those attributes from the summary representation. To obtain those attributes, you can fetch the detailed representation.

The documentation provides an example response for each API method. The example response illustrates all attributes that are returned by that method.

Hypermedia

All resources may have one or more *_url properties linking to other resources. These are meant to provide explicit URLs so that proper API clients don't need to construct URLs on their own. It is highly recommended that API clients use these. Doing so will make future upgrades of the API easier for developers. All URLs are expected to be proper RFC 6570 URI templates.

You can then expand these templates using something like the uri_template gem:

>> tmpl = URITemplate.new('/notifications{?since,all,participating}')
>> tmpl.expand
=> "/notifications"

>> tmpl.expand all: 1
=> "/notifications?all=1"

>> tmpl.expand all: 1, participating: 1
=> "/notifications?all=1&participating=1"

Next steps

This article demonstrated how to list and create issues in a repository. For more practice, try to comment on an issue, edit the title of an issue, or close an issue. For more information, see the "Create an issue comment" endpoint and the "Update an issue" endpoint.

For more information about other endpoints that you can use, see the REST reference documentation.