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Esta versión de GitHub Enterprise Server se discontinuará el 2024-08-29. No se realizarán lanzamientos de patch, ni siquiera para problemas de seguridad críticos. Para obtener rendimiento mejorado, seguridad mejorada y nuevas características, actualice a la versión más reciente de GitHub Enterprise Server. Para obtener ayuda con la actualización, póngase en contacto con el soporte técnico de GitHub Enterprise.

Streaming del registro de auditoría de su empresa

Aprenda a trasmitir datos de eventos de Git y de auditorías desde GitHub hacia un sistema externo de administración de datos.

¿Quién puede utilizar esta característica?

Enterprise owners

Note

Webhooks might be a good alternative to the audit log or API polling for certain use cases. Webhooks are a way for GitHub to notify your server when specific events occur for a repository, organization, or enterprise. Compared to the API or searching the audit log, webhooks can be more efficient if you just want to learn and possibly log when certain events occur on your enterprise, organization, or repository. For more information, see "Webhooks documentation."

About audit log streaming

You can help protect intellectual property and maintain compliance for your company by using streaming to keep copies of your audit log data. The audit log details events such as changes to settings and access, user membership, app permissions, and more. See "Audit log events for your enterprise", "Audit log events for your organization", and "Security log events."

Streaming audit log data has these benefits:

  • Data exploration. Examine streamed events using your preferred tool for querying large quantities of data. The stream contains both audit events and Git events across the entire enterprise account.
  • Data retention. Keep your exported audit logs and Git events data as long as you need to.

You can set up or delete a stream at any time. The stream exports audit and Git events data for all of the organizations in your enterprise, for activity from the time the stream is enabled onwards.

All streamed audit logs are sent as compressed JSON files. The filename format is inYYYY/MM/HH/MM/<uuid>.json.gz.

Note

GitHub uses an at-least-once delivery method. Due to certain network or system issues, some events may be duplicated.

Enabling audit log streaming can cause a minor impact on the performance of your GitHub Enterprise Server instance. To learn about increasing resources to mitigate this performance impact, see "Increasing CPU or memory resources."

Setting up audit log streaming

To set up the audit log stream, follow the instructions for your provider:

Setting up streaming to Amazon S3

Note

The Amazon region us-east-1 must be reachable from your appliance for streaming to S3 to work.

To set up audit log streaming from GitHub you will need:

  • Your AWS access key ID
  • Your AWS secret key

For information on creating or accessing your access key ID and secret key, see Understanding and getting your AWS credentials in the AWS documentation.

From AWS:

  1. Create a bucket, and block public access to the bucket. See Creating, configuring, and working with Amazon S3 buckets in the AWS documentation.

  2. Create a policy that allows GitHub to write to the bucket. Copy the following JSON and replace EXAMPLE-BUCKET with the name of your bucket. GitHub requires only the permissions in this JSON.

    {
       "Version": "2012-10-17",
       "Statement": [
          {
             "Sid": "VisualEditor0",
             "Effect": "Allow",
             "Action": [
                "s3:PutObject"
             ],
             "Resource": "arn:aws:s3:::EXAMPLE-BUCKET/*"
         }
       ]
    }
    

    See Creating IAM policies in the AWS documentation.

From GitHub:

  1. In the top-right corner of GitHub Enterprise Server, click your profile photo, then click Enterprise settings.

    Screenshot of the drop-down menu that appears when you click the profile photo on GitHub Enterprise Server. The "Enterprise settings" option is highlighted in a dark orange outline.

  2. On the left side of the page, in the enterprise account sidebar, click Settings.

  3. Under " Settings", click Audit log.

  4. Under "Audit log", click Log streaming.

  5. Select the Configure stream dropdown menu and click Amazon S3.

  6. Configure the stream settings.

    • Under "Bucket", type the name of the bucket you want to stream to. For example, auditlog-streaming-test.
    • Under "Access Key ID", type your access key ID. For example, ABCAIOSFODNN7EXAMPLE1.
    • Under "Secret Key", type your secret key. For example, aBcJalrXUtnWXYZ/A1MDENG/zPxRfiCYEXAMPLEKEY.
  7. To verify that GitHub can connect and write to the Amazon S3 endpoint, click Check endpoint.

  8. After you have successfully verified the endpoint, click Save.

Integrating with AWS CloudTrail Lake

You can consolidate your audit logs by integrating streaming to S3 with AWS CloudTrail Lake. See the AWS CloudTrail Documentation or the GitHub Audit Log to CloudTrail Open Audit in the aws-samples/aws-cloudtrail-lake-github-audit-log repository.

Setting up streaming to Azure Blob Storage

Before setting up a stream in GitHub, first create a storage account and a container in Microsoft Azure. See Introduction to Azure Blob Storage in the Microsoft documentation.

To configure the stream, you need the URL of a SAS token.

From the Microsoft Azure portal:

  1. On the Home page, click Storage Accounts.
  2. Under "Name", click the name of the storage account you want to use.
  3. Under "Data storage", click Containers.
  4. Click the name of the container you want to use.
  5. In the left sidebar, under "Settings", click Shared access tokens.
  6. Select the Permissions dropdown menu, then select Create and Write and deselect all other options.
  7. Set an expiry date that complies with your secret rotation policy.
  8. Click Generate SAS token and URL.
  9. Copy the value of the Blob SAS URL field that's displayed. You will use this URL in GitHub.

From GitHub:

  1. In the top-right corner of GitHub Enterprise Server, click your profile photo, then click Enterprise settings.

    Screenshot of the drop-down menu that appears when you click the profile photo on GitHub Enterprise Server. The "Enterprise settings" option is highlighted in a dark orange outline.

  2. On the left side of the page, in the enterprise account sidebar, click Settings.

  3. Under " Settings", click Audit log.

  4. Under "Audit log", click Log streaming.

  5. Select the Configure stream dropdown menu and click Azure Blob Storage.

  6. On the configuration page, enter the blob SAS URL that you copied in Azure. The Container field is auto-filled based on the URL.

  7. Click Check endpoint to verify that GitHub can connect and write to the Azure Blob Storage endpoint.

  8. After you have successfully verified the endpoint, click Save.

Setting up streaming to Azure Event Hubs

Before setting up a stream in GitHub, you must first have an event hub namespace in Microsoft Azure. Next, create an event hub instance within the namespace. You'll need the details of this event hub instance when you set up the stream. See Quickstart: Create an event hub using Azure portal in the Microsoft documentation.

You will also need your event hub's instance name and the connection string.

From the Microsoft Azure portal:

  1. At the top of the page, use the search box to search for "Event Hubs".
  2. Select Event Hubs. The names of your event hubs are listed.
  3. Make a note of the name of the event hub to which you want to stream. Click the event hub.
  4. In the left menu, click Shared Access Policies.
  5. Select a shared access policy from the list of policies, or create a new policy.
  6. Copy the connection string from the Connection string-primary key field.

From GitHub:

  1. In the top-right corner of GitHub Enterprise Server, click your profile photo, then click Enterprise settings.

    Screenshot of the drop-down menu that appears when you click the profile photo on GitHub Enterprise Server. The "Enterprise settings" option is highlighted in a dark orange outline.

  2. On the left side of the page, in the enterprise account sidebar, click Settings.

  3. Under " Settings", click Audit log.

  4. Under "Audit log", click Log streaming.

  5. Select the Configure stream dropdown and click Azure Event Hubs.

  6. On the configuration page, enter:

    • The name of the Azure Event Hubs instance.
    • The connection string.
  7. Click Check endpoint to verify that GitHub can connect and write to the Azure Events Hub endpoint.

  8. After you have successfully verified the endpoint, click Save.

Setting up streaming to Datadog

To set up streaming to Datadog, create a client token or an API key in Datadog, then configure audit log streaming in GitHub Enterprise Server using the token for authentication. You do not need to create a bucket or other storage container in Datadog.

After you set up streaming to Datadog, you can see your audit log data by filtering by "github.audit.streaming." See Log Management.

  1. If you don't already have a Datadog account, create one.

  2. In Datadog, generate a client token or an API key and then click Copy key. See API and Application Keys in Datadog Docs.

  3. In the top-right corner of GitHub Enterprise Server, click your profile photo, then click Enterprise settings.

    Screenshot of the drop-down menu that appears when you click the profile photo on GitHub Enterprise Server. The "Enterprise settings" option is highlighted in a dark orange outline.

  4. On the left side of the page, in the enterprise account sidebar, click Settings.

  5. Under " Settings", click Audit log.

  6. Under "Audit log", click Log streaming.

  7. Select the Configure stream dropdown and click Datadog.

  8. In the Token field, paste the token you copied earlier.

  9. Select the Site dropdown and click your Datadog site. To determine your site, compare your Datadog URL to the table in Datadog sites in Datadog Docs.

  10. To verify that GitHub can connect and write to the Datadog endpoint, click Check endpoint.

  11. After you have successfully verified the endpoint, click Save.

  12. After a few minutes, confirm that audit log data appears on the Logs tab in Datadog. If it doesn't appear, confirm that your token and site are correct in GitHub.

Setting up streaming to Google Cloud Storage

To set up streaming to Google Cloud Storage, create a service account in Google Cloud with the appropriate credentials and permissions, then configure audit log streaming in GitHub Enterprise Server using the service account's credentials for authentication.

  1. Create a service account for Google Cloud. You do not need to set access controls or IAM roles for this account. See Creating and managing service accounts in the Google Cloud documentation.

  2. Create a JSON key for the service account, and store the key securely. See Creating and managing service account keys in the Google Cloud documentation.

  3. If you haven't yet, create a bucket. See Creating storage buckets in the Google Cloud documentation.

  4. Give the service account the Storage Object Creator role for the bucket. See Using Cloud IAM permissions in the Google Cloud documentation.

  5. In the top-right corner of GitHub Enterprise Server, click your profile photo, then click Enterprise settings.

    Screenshot of the drop-down menu that appears when you click the profile photo on GitHub Enterprise Server. The "Enterprise settings" option is highlighted in a dark orange outline.

  6. On the left side of the page, in the enterprise account sidebar, click Settings.

  7. Under " Settings", click Audit log.

  8. Under "Audit log", click Log streaming.

  9. Select the Configure stream dropdown and click Google Cloud Storage.

  10. Under "Bucket", type the name of your Google Cloud Storage bucket.

  11. Under "JSON Credentials", paste the entire contents of your service account's JSON key file.

  12. To verify that GitHub can connect and write to the Google Cloud Storage bucket, click Check endpoint.

  13. After you have successfully verified the endpoint, click Save.

Setting up streaming to Splunk

To stream audit logs to Splunk's HTTP Event Collector (HEC) endpoint, make sure that the endpoint is configured to accept HTTPS connections. See Set up and use HTTP Event Collector in Splunk Web in the Splunk documentation.

Note

GitHub validates the HEC endpoint via <Domain>:port/services/collector. If self-hosting the endpoint (such as with Splunk HEC Receiver via OpenTelemetry), make sure it's reachable at this destination.

  1. In the top-right corner of GitHub Enterprise Server, click your profile photo, then click Enterprise settings.

    Screenshot of the drop-down menu that appears when you click the profile photo on GitHub Enterprise Server. The "Enterprise settings" option is highlighted in a dark orange outline.

  2. On the left side of the page, in the enterprise account sidebar, click Settings.

  3. Under " Settings", click Audit log.

  4. Under "Audit log", click Log streaming.

  5. Select the Configure stream dropdown and click Splunk.

  6. On the configuration page, enter:

    • The domain where the application you want to stream to is hosted.

      If you're using Splunk Cloud, Domain should be http-inputs-<host>, where host is the domain you use in Splunk Cloud. For example, http-inputs-mycompany.splunkcloud.com.

      If you're using the free trial version of Splunk Cloud, Domain should be inputs.<host>, where host is the domain you use in Splunk Cloud. For example, inputs.mycompany.splunkcloud.com.

    • The port on which the application accepts data.

      If you're using Splunk Cloud, Port should be 443.

      If you're using the free trial version of Splunk Cloud, Port should be 8088.

    • A token that GitHub can use to authenticate to the third-party application.

  7. Leave the Enable SSL verification check box selected.

    Audit logs are always streamed as encrypted data, however, with this option selected, GitHub verifies the SSL certificate of your Splunk instance when delivering events. SSL verification helps ensure that events are delivered to your URL endpoint securely. Verification is optional, but we recommend you leave SSL verification enabled.

  8. Click Check endpoint to verify that GitHub can connect and write to the Splunk endpoint.

  9. After you have successfully verified the endpoint, click Save.

Deleting the audit log stream

  1. In the top-right corner of GitHub Enterprise Server, click your profile photo, then click Enterprise settings.

    Screenshot of the drop-down menu that appears when you click the profile photo on GitHub Enterprise Server. The "Enterprise settings" option is highlighted in a dark orange outline.

  2. On the left side of the page, in the enterprise account sidebar, click Settings.

  3. Under " Settings", click Audit log.

  4. Under "Audit log", click Log streaming.

  5. Under "Danger zone", click Delete stream.

  6. A confirmation message displays. Click Delete stream to confirm.