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Understanding GitHub Actions

Learn the basics of GitHub Actions, including core concepts and essential terminology.

Nota: Actualmente los ejecutores hospedados en GitHub no se admiten en GitHub Enterprise Server. Puede ver más información sobre la compatibilidad futura planeada en GitHub public roadmap.

Overview

GitHub Actions es una plataforma de integración y despliegue continuos (IC/DC) que te permite automatizar tu mapa de compilación, pruebas y despliegue. You can create workflows that build and test every pull request to your repository, or deploy merged pull requests to production.

GitHub Actions goes beyond just DevOps and lets you run workflows when other events happen in your repository. For example, you can run a workflow to automatically add the appropriate labels whenever someone creates a new issue in your repository.

You must host your own Linux, Windows, or macOS virtual machines to run workflows for your GitHub Enterprise Server instance. Los ejecutores autohospedados pueden ser físicos, virtuales, en un contenedor, locales o en una nube.

For more information about introducing GitHub Actions to your enterprise, see "Introducing GitHub Actions to your enterprise."

The components of GitHub Actions

You can configure a GitHub Actions workflow to be triggered when an event occurs in your repository, such as a pull request being opened or an issue being created. Your workflow contains one or more jobs which can run in sequential order or in parallel. Each job will run inside its own virtual machine runner, or inside a container, and has one or more steps that either run a script that you define or run an action, which is a reusable extension that can simplify your workflow.

Workflow overview

Workflows

Un flujo de trabajo es un proceso automatizado configurable que ejecutará uno o más jobs. Los flujos de trabajo se definen mediante un archivo de YAML que se verifica en tu repositorio y se ejecutará cuando lo active un evento dentro de este o puede activarse manualmente o en una programación definida.

Los flujos de trabajo se definen en el directorio .github/workflows de un repositorio y un repositorio puede tener varios flujos de trabajo, cada uno de los cuales puede realizar un conjunto diferente de tareas. Por ejemplo, puedes tener un flujo de trabajo para crear y probar las solicitudes de cambio, otro para desplegar tu aplicación cada que se cree un lanzamiento y todavía otro más que agregue una etiqueta cada que alguien abra una propuesta nueva.

You can reference a workflow within another workflow, see "Reusing workflows."

For more information about workflows, see "Using workflows."

Events

An event is a specific activity in a repository that triggers a workflow run. For example, activity can originate from GitHub when someone creates a pull request, opens an issue, or pushes a commit to a repository. You can also trigger a workflow run on a schedule, by posting to a REST API, or manually.

For a complete list of events that can be used to trigger workflows, see Events that trigger workflows.

Jobs

A job is a set of steps in a workflow that execute on the same runner. Each step is either a shell script that will be executed, or an action that will be run. Steps are executed in order and are dependent on each other. Since each step is executed on the same runner, you can share data from one step to another. For example, you can have a step that builds your application followed by a step that tests the application that was built.

You can configure a job's dependencies with other jobs; by default, jobs have no dependencies and run in parallel with each other. When a job takes a dependency on another job, it will wait for the dependent job to complete before it can run. For example, you may have multiple build jobs for different architectures that have no dependencies, and a packaging job that is dependent on those jobs. The build jobs will run in parallel, and when they have all completed successfully, the packaging job will run.

For more information about jobs, see "Using jobs."

Actions

An action is a custom application for the GitHub Actions platform that performs a complex but frequently repeated task. Use an action to help reduce the amount of repetitive code that you write in your workflow files. An action can pull your git repository from GitHub, set up the correct toolchain for your build environment, or set up the authentication to your cloud provider.

You can write your own actions, or you can find actions to use in your workflows in the GitHub Marketplace.

Para compartir las acciones en toda la empresa sin publicarlas de forma pública, puedes almacenarlas en un repositorio interno y luego configurarlo para que acceda a los flujos de trabajo de GitHub Actions en otros repositorios que sean propiedad de la misma organización o de una organización de la empresa. Para más información, vea "Uso compartido de acciones y flujos de trabajo con la empresa".

For more information, see "Creating actions."

Runners

Un ejecutor es un servidor que ejecuta tus flujos de trabajo cuando se activan. Each runner can run a single job at a time. You must host your own runners for GitHub Enterprise Server. For more information, see "Hosting your own runners."

Create an example workflow

GitHub Actions uses YAML syntax to define the workflow. Each workflow is stored as a separate YAML file in your code repository, in a directory named .github/workflows.

You can create an example workflow in your repository that automatically triggers a series of commands whenever code is pushed. In this workflow, GitHub Actions checks out the pushed code, installs the bats testing framework, and runs a basic command to output the bats version: bats -v.

  1. In your repository, create the .github/workflows/ directory to store your workflow files.

  2. In the .github/workflows/ directory, create a new file called learn-github-actions.yml and add the following code.

    YAML
    name: learn-github-actions
    on: [push]
    jobs:
      check-bats-version:
        runs-on: ubuntu-latest
        steps:
          - uses: actions/checkout@v3
          - uses: actions/setup-node@v3
            with:
              node-version: '14'
          - run: npm install -g bats
          - run: bats -v
  3. Commit these changes and push them to your GitHub repository.

Your new GitHub Actions workflow file is now installed in your repository and will run automatically each time someone pushes a change to the repository. To see the details about a workflow's execution history, see "Viewing the activity for a workflow run."

Understanding the workflow file

To help you understand how YAML syntax is used to create a workflow file, this section explains each line of the introduction's example:

name: learn-github-actions
Optional - The name of the workflow as it will appear in the "Actions" tab of the GitHub repository.
on: [push]
Specifies the trigger for this workflow. This example uses the push event, so a workflow run is triggered every time someone pushes a change to the repository or merges a pull request. This is triggered by a push to every branch; for examples of syntax that runs only on pushes to specific branches, paths, or tags, see "Workflow syntax for GitHub Actions."
jobs:
Groups together all the jobs that run in the learn-github-actions workflow.
check-bats-version:
Defines a job named check-bats-version. The child keys will define properties of the job.
  runs-on: ubuntu-latest
Configures the job to run on the latest version of an Ubuntu Linux runner. This means that the job will execute on a fresh virtual machine hosted by GitHub. For syntax examples using other runners, see "Workflow syntax for GitHub Actions."
  steps:
Groups together all the steps that run in the check-bats-version job. Each item nested under this section is a separate action or shell script.
    - uses: actions/checkout@v3
The uses keyword specifies that this step will run v3 of the actions/checkout action. This is an action that checks out your repository onto the runner, allowing you to run scripts or other actions against your code (such as build and test tools). You should use the checkout action any time your workflow will run against the repository's code.
    - uses: actions/setup-node@v3
      with:
        node-version: '14'
This step uses the actions/setup-node@v3 action to install the specified version of the Node.js (this example uses v14). This puts both the node and npm commands in your PATH.
    - run: npm install -g bats
The run keyword tells the job to execute a command on the runner. In this case, you are using npm to install the bats software testing package.
    - run: bats -v
Finally, you'll run the bats command with a parameter that outputs the software version.

Visualizing the workflow file

In this diagram, you can see the workflow file you just created and how the GitHub Actions components are organized in a hierarchy. Each step executes a single action or shell script. Steps 1 and 2 run actions, while steps 3 and 4 run shell scripts. To find more prebuilt actions for your workflows, see "Finding and customizing actions."

Workflow overview

Viewing the activity for a workflow run

When your workflow is triggered, a workflow run is created that executes the workflow. After a workflow run has started, you can see a visualization graph of the run's progress and view each step's activity on GitHub.

  1. En your GitHub Enterprise Server instance, vaya a la página principal del repositorio.

  2. Under your repository name, click Actions.

    Navigate to repository

  3. In the left sidebar, click the workflow you want to see.

    Screenshot of workflow results

  4. Under "Workflow runs", click the name of the run you want to see.

    Screenshot of workflow runs

  5. Under Jobs or in the visualization graph, click the job you want to see.

    Select job

  6. View the results of each step.

    Screenshot of workflow run details

Next steps

GitHub Actions can help you automate nearly every aspect of your application development processes. Ready to get started? Here are some helpful resources for taking your next steps with GitHub Actions:

  • For continuous integration (CI) workflows to build and test your code, see "Automating builds and tests."
  • For building and publishing packages, see "Publishing packages."
  • For deploying projects, see "Deployment."
  • For automating tasks and processes on GitHub, see "Managing issues and pull requests."
  • For examples that demonstrate more complex features of GitHub Actions, including many of the above use cases, see "Examples." You can see detailed examples that explain how to test your code on a runner, access the GitHub CLI, and use advanced features such as concurrency and test matrices.

Contacting support

Si necesitas ayuda con lo que sea relacionado con la configuración de flujo de trabajo, tal como la sintaxis, los ejecutores hospedados en GitHub, o la creación de acciones, busca un tema existente o inicia uno nuevo en la categoría de GitHub Actions y GitHub Packages de GitHub Community.

Si tienes algún tipo de retroalimentación o solicitudes de características para GitHub Actions, compártelas en el Debates de la comunidad de GitHub para Acciones de GitHub.

Contacta a el administrador del sitio para cualquiera de los siguientes, que tu tipo de uso o el tipo de uso que pretendes tener caiga en las siguientes categorías de limitación:

  • Si crees que tu cuenta se ha restringido de manera incorrecta
  • Si llegas un error inesperado cuando ejecutas una de tus acciones, por ejemplo: una ID única
  • Si llegas a una situación en donde el comportamiento existente contradice a aquél que se espera, pero no siempre se documenta

Further reading