Building and testing .NET

You can create a continuous integration (CI) workflow to build and test your .NET project.

GitHub Actions ist verfügbar mit GitHub Free, GitHub Pro, GitHub Free für Organisationen, GitHub Team, GitHub Enterprise Cloud, und GitHub AE. GitHub Actions ist nicht verfügbar für private Repositorys, die im Besitz von Konten mit älteren Pro-Repository-Plänen sind.

Note: GitHub-hosted runners are not currently supported on GitHub Enterprise Server. You can see more information about planned future support on the GitHub public roadmap.

Einführung

This guide shows you how to build, test, and publish a .NET package.

GitHub-hosted runners have a tools cache with preinstalled software, which includes the .NET Core SDK. For a full list of up-to-date software and the preinstalled versions of .NET Core SDK, see software installed on GitHub-hosted runners.

Vorrausetzungen

You should already be familiar with YAML syntax and how it's used with GitHub Actions. Weitere Informationen findest Du unter „Workflow-Syntax für GitHub Actions“.

We recommend that you have a basic understanding of the .NET Core SDK. For more information, see Getting started with .NET.

Starting with the .NET workflow template

GitHub provides a .NET workflow template that should work for most .NET projects, and this guide includes examples that show you how to customize this template. For more information, see the .NET workflow template.

Um schnell loszulegen, füge die Vorlage in das Verzeichnis .github/workflows Deines Repositorys ein.

name: dotnet package

on: [push]

jobs:
  build:

    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    strategy:
      matrix:
        dotnet-version: ['3.0', '3.1.x', '5.0.x' ]

    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v2
      - name: Setup .NET Core SDK ${{ matrix.dotnet-version }}
        uses: actions/setup-dotnet@v1.7.2
        with:
          dotnet-version: ${{ matrix.dotnet-version }}
      - name: Install dependencies
        run: dotnet restore
      - name: Build
        run: dotnet build --configuration Release --no-restore
      - name: Test
        run: dotnet test --no-restore --verbosity normal

Specifying a .NET version

To use a preinstalled version of the .NET Core SDK on a GitHub-hosted runner, use the setup-dotnet action. This action finds a specific version of .NET from the tools cache on each runner, and adds the necessary binaries to PATH. These changes will persist for the remainder of the job.

The setup-dotnet action is the recommended way of using .NET with GitHub Actions, because it ensures consistent behavior across different runners and different versions of .NET. If you are using a self-hosted runner, you must install .NET and add it to PATH. For more information, see the setup-dotnet action.

Using multiple .NET versions

name: dotnet package

on: [push]

jobs:
  build:

    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    strategy:
      matrix:
        dotnet: [ '3.0', '3.1.x', '5.0.x' ]

    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v2
      - name: Setup dotnet ${{ matrix.dotnet-version }}
        uses: actions/setup-dotnet@v1
        with:
          dotnet-version: ${{ matrix.dotnet-version }}
      # You can test your matrix by printing the current dotnet version
      - name: Display dotnet version
        run: dotnet --version

Using a specific .NET version

You can configure your job to use a specific version of .NET, such as 3.1.3. Alternatively, you can use semantic version syntax to get the latest minor release. This example uses the latest minor release of .NET 3.

    - name: Setup .NET 3.x
      uses: actions/setup-dotnet@v1
      with:
        # Semantic version range syntax or exact version of a dotnet version
        dotnet-version: '3.x' 

Abhängigkeiten installieren

GitHub-hosted runners have the NuGet package manager installed. You can use the dotnet CLI to install dependencies from the NuGet package registry before building and testing your code. For example, the YAML below installs the Newtonsoft package.

steps:
- uses: actions/checkout@v2
- name: Setup dotnet
  uses: actions/setup-dotnet@v1
  with:
    dotnet-version: '3.1.x'
- name: Install dependencies
  run: dotnet add package Newtonsoft.Json --version 12.0.1

Deinen Code bauen und testen

Du kannst die gleichen Befehle verwenden, die Du auch lokal verwendest, um Deinen Code zu erstellen und zu testen. This example demonstrates how to use dotnet build and dotnet test in a job:

steps:
- uses: actions/checkout@v2
- name: Setup dotnet
  uses: actions/setup-dotnet@v1
  with:
    dotnet-version: '3.1.x'
- name: Install dependencies
  run: dotnet restore
- name: Build
  run: dotnet build
- name: Test with the dotnet CLI
  run: dotnet test

Workflow-Daten als Artefakte paketieren

After a workflow completes, you can upload the resulting artifacts for analysis. Zum Beispiel kann es notwendig sein, Logdateien, Core Dumps, Testergebnisse oder Screenshots zu speichern. The following example demonstrates how you can use the upload-artifact action to upload test results.

Weitere Informationen findest Du unter "Workflow-Daten mittels Artefakten persistieren."

name: dotnet package

on: [push]

jobs:
  build:

    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    strategy:
      matrix:
        dotnet-version: [ '3.0', '3.1.x', '5.0.x' ]

      steps:
        - uses: actions/checkout@v2
        - name: Setup dotnet
          uses: actions/setup-dotnet@v1
          with:
            dotnet-version: ${{ matrix.dotnet-version }}
        - name: Install dependencies
          run: dotnet restore
        - name: Test with dotnet
          run: dotnet test --logger trx --results-directory "TestResults-${{ matrix.dotnet-version }}"
        - name: Upload dotnet test results
          uses: actions/upload-artifact@v2
          with:
            name: dotnet-results-${{ matrix.dotnet-version }}
            path: TestResults-${{ matrix.dotnet-version }}
          # Use always() to always run this step to publish test results when there are test failures
          if: ${{ always() }}

In Paket-Registries veröffentlichen

You can configure your workflow to publish your Dotnet package to a package registry when your CI tests pass. You can use repository secrets to store any tokens or credentials needed to publish your binary. The following example creates and publishes a package to GitHub Packages using dotnet core cli.

name: Upload dotnet package

on:
  release:
    types: [created]

jobs:
  deploy:
    runs-on: ubuntu-latest
    steps:
      - uses: actions/checkout@v2
      - uses: actions/setup-dotnet@v1
        with:
          dotnet-version: '3.1.x' # SDK Version to use.
          source-url: https://nuget.pkg.github.com/<owner>/index.json
        env:
          NUGET_AUTH_TOKEN: ${{secrets.GITHUB_TOKEN}}
      - run: dotnet build --configuration Release <my project>
      - name: Create the package
        run: dotnet pack --configuration Release <my project>
      - name: Publish the package to GPR
        run: dotnet nuget push <my project>/bin/Release/*.nupkg

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